Month: February 2015

The onesie: a red flag sign for GPs

Adam Staten is a GP trainee in Surrey and is on Twitter @adamstaten. Cold reading is the art of obtaining information about a person by making a rapid assessment of their body language, manner, age, dress and behaviour. It is commonly used by psychics, mediums and illusionists. General practitioners do it too, whether it’s noticing the subtle nail changes in an undiagnosed psoriatic, or clocking the smell of stale alcohol on the problem drinker. We find clues about patients all over them and all around them. In exams the signs are usually obvious, it may be the inhaler and...

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Anorexia nervosa: how I’m inspired to be a GP

Claire Morgan is a final year medical student and shares her experience in managing her anorexia nervosa. National Eating Disorders Awareness Week runs from the 22nd to 28th February 2015. I am a final year medical student and in recovery from anorexia nervosa. At a time when general practice is receiving a lot of negative press I would like to share my experience as a patient and how I have been inspired to pursue a career in general practice. My anorexia really took a firm hold when I left home and began studying medicine. Away from home my weight...

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The NHS – ‘S’ is for Service not Slave

Peter Aird is a GP in Bridgwater, Somerset. It’s a confusing time for the NHS. One minute there’s talk of if being ‘weaponised’ like some all consuming superhero, the next it’s being sent to bed with no supper for causing all those ‘avoidable deaths’. It seems the NHS is not so much a service that is offered but rather a slave that is used – and abused – by those who would seek to master it for their own, often political ends. But it’s not just the politicians who behave like this. Nor is it only the pharmaceutical industry...

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Folie à deux: The case of Ed and Dave

Adam Staten is a GP trainee in Surrey and is on Twitter @adamstaten. La folie à deux is a shared psychosis in which two people share the same delusion. As it is rare I felt compelled to share an interesting case that I have recently encountered. This unusual case concerns two men in their forties, let’s call them Ed and Dave. These two men share little in common but both have interesting past psychiatric histories. Ed has had a previous prolonged episode of shared mania, a folie à plusiers if you will. For nearly thirteen years between 1997 and 2010 this...

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Review: A Fortunate Man

Professor Roger Jones is editor of the British Journal of General Practice. A Fortunate Man: the story of a country doctor. John Berger and Jean Mohr. Canongate, London, 2015 First published in 1967, this is one of those must-read general practice books, essential for every trainer, trainee and practice library, and one, I suspect, which has been more frequently recommended than read. It has been re-issued this year in a new edition with an introduction by Dr Gavin Francis. Anyone coming fresh to A Fortunate Man, expecting a paean to idyllic country general practice, will be disappointed, because the romanticised hero of...

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