Tag: Adam Staten

Book Review: The State of Medicine by Margaret McCartney

The State of Medicine is an eloquent, passionate, comprehensive, and, in many ways, dispiriting overview of the repeated damage inflicted on the NHS at the whim of successive governments. The frustration of the author, a GP from Glasgow, pours from every page, every paragraph and every sentence, as she contrasts the efforts of doctors to practice evidence based, safe, humane and cost-effective medicine, in a system that is routinely upended and overhauled according to manifesto sound bite, political opinion and, occasionally, outright self-interest. Whilst the general themes of this book will surprise few who work in the NHS, the...

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Time for the old guard to join the social media fray?

The news is everywhere. I don’t mean this in the way that I might if I were a dewy-eyed aspiring journalist, seeing fascination and potential scoops in everything around me. I mean that news coverage seems to be literally everywhere; on the TV, on the radio, on the computer, on the phone in my pocket, on a big screen in Waterloo train station. It’s inescapable. And when it comes to health news, or more particularly doctor news, it never seems to be good news. Headlines such as: “1 in 4 cancer cases missed: GPs send away alarming number of...

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Home surveys and colonoscopies: coping with risk and reassurance

[starbox id=adamstaten] Today I am writing from the most middle class circle of hell; the circle of hell where sinners are stuck in a perpetual home buying chain. Of all the costly obstacles to selling and buying houses, I have found the home survey amongst the most frustrating. The survey of our house was bizarrely damning and, whilst the surveyor found no actual evidence of things having gone wrong, he was full of apocalyptic ideas of things that might go wrong. Annoying though all this was, I felt some kinship with the surveyor. I recognised the words of a man who was covering himself against future litigation. Lines such as ‘this type of guttering can leak, if it leaks it might cause damp, if there is damp the woodwork might rot’ brought to my mind entries in children’s medical notes which effectively read, ‘this child has the snuffles, I can see no evidence of meningitis, sepsis, Kawasaki’s etc. etc., but should any of these things happen take the child to hospital.’ Our surveyor suggested going to some pretty extreme lengths to make sure all was well. He suggested tearing up some floorboards to make sure the floor joists weren’t rotten, dismantling the bathroom units to make sure there were no leaks, and re damp-proofing the house in case the existing damp course was insufficient. Essentially he would remain unsatisfied...

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The Joy of Diagnosis: how to attract candidates to general practice

Diagnosis is one of the most rewarding aspects of medicine and is one of the most attractive features of general practice.  There are few areas of medicine, arguably just general practice and the Emergency Department, where you get the opportunity to encounter a patient ‘fresh’, no prior history, no prior investigations, just you, the patient, and your clinical acumen. In general practice we often get the opportunity to make a diagnosis several times in the same ten minute period and, for me, the less investigating and referring I have to do to make a diagnosis the more satisfying it...

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GP trainees: a subtle thread of generalism in secondary care

Adam Staten is a GP trainee in Surrey and is on Twitter @adamstaten. The current struggle to recruit into general practice has been well described and the concern around it has rightly focused on how a shrinking workforce will continue to provide 90% of patient contact in the NHS without imploding. Having recently completed the last of my hospital placements as a GP trainee, I have been reflecting back on my time in hospital and have come to believe that falling numbers of GPs in training will also impact secondary care services in a number of subtle ways. The...

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The British Journal of General Practice and BJGP Open are bringing research to clinical practice. This is where we add the debate and opinion to help ensure everyone benefits from that research.

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