Tag: junior doctor pay

Junior doctor dispute: The politicisation of a generation

Thuvaraka Ware is a GP Registrar working in Camden. She tutors medical students at UCL in community medicine and believes primary care research will shape clinical and public health policy over the coming years. I am a junior doctor. I went through medical school, foundation and speciality programmes with relative ease and multiple accolades.  I married a guitar playing, Aston Villa supporting historian I met at university who entered policy work.  I would scoff at his insistence that politics was important – I truly believed that I was doing the only true and noble job in the world. Politics...

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Junior doctor pay changes will damage general practice: the trainee view

Ravi Parekh is an academic clinical fellow in General Practice in North-West London with an interest in Medical Education. I am a GP registrar working in London and over the past few months I have felt increasingly apprehensive about the future of general practice training in the UK. The latest blow to our training comes in the form of the recommendations from the DDRB report on the future of doctor’s pay.1 This independent report states the GP trainee supplement should be removed (currently 45% supplement) and replaced with “a flexible pay premium” known as a RRP (recruitment and retention premium), with trainees paid for the amount of unsociable work that is carried out, and a possible flexible pay premium adjusted locally, to help target problems with recruitment. Firstly, in the majority of cases, this change will mean a substantial pay cut as trainees progress from a SHO (ST1 and 2) to a registrar (ST3). A large number of hospital rotations will include a substantial amount of unsociable work, which currently is remunerated with normally between 40-50% banding on top of the basic salary. However, the new proposals will mean despite career progression, increased responsibility within a higher risk setting, and working far more independently in the registrar year, there will be a significant pay cut. This would equate to a substantial penalty for choosing general practice as a career....

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BJGP Letter: A bleak future for future GPs in England

Guy Rughani is a Foundation Year 2 doctor working in North London. He wrote this short letter to the BJGP. Contribute to the BJGP at http://bjgp.org/letters. I want to be a GP, but the government is doing everything it can to stop me. Mr Hunt’s brilliant answer to the crisis in GP recruitment is to slash trainee pay by 30%, penalise doctors taking maternity leave or extra degrees and extend normal working hours.1 Morale amongst my peers about to apply for specialty training is catastrophically low. As a result, the majority of my friends are looking to move from the NHS and take a ‘Foundation Year 3: FY3’ because they perceive that their immediate future here is bleak.  At a time in our careers when we should be optimistic and enthusiastic, it’s tragic that the state of the English NHS is leaving us so disillusioned. Scotland has dismissed the new junior contract, making a move North ever more tempting. We need a strong positive message from senior doctors that there is a bright future in English General Practice, and a commitment from government that our incomes will be protected and our efforts valued. 1: BMA Junior and Consultant contract negotiations explained:...

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