Tag: research

SAPC Dangerous Idea: funding research through Kickstarter

Sarah Knowles (@dr_know) is a Research Fellow at the University of Manchester. Her interests are mental health, applied health services research and patient and public involvement and engagement. Since 2012, the Society for Academic Primary Care has run a competition at their Annual Conference called the Dangerous Idea Soapbox. The soapbox offers primary care clinicians and researchers a platform to share a dangerous idea that they think needs to be heard by the Academic Primary Care community. Submissions are judged prior to acceptance based on how challenging and cutting edge they are. Those chosen are presented through lightning pitches (2 minutes, 1 slide) in the Soapbox session, after which the audience can debate the ideas presented with the speakers before a final vote to decide that year’s most dangerous idea. In 2015, I presented my idea that “Health research should be crowd funded through Kickstarter”, inspired by conversations with patients and members of the public involved in research, to challenge the audience with the idea that publicly funded research should have public backing before we’re allowed to get our hands on the money. Kickstarter is a crowdfunding platform. You don’t have a product available which people choose and you then sell, like you would in a shop. Instead, you ask for investment up front from potential ‘backers’ and if you don’t get enough promised custom then your product does...

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Altmetrics: now available for BJGP articles

The world of scholarly publishing is changing rapidly, partly in response to digital publication, and also with more focus on the dissemination and implementation of published research. Traditional bibliometrics, such as the impact factor, have been used to measure aggregated citation rates as a proxy measure of journal quality. There is now more interest in looking at article-level and author-level metrics. Peer-review publication is one component of an ‘ecosystem’ of dissemination, which includes, for example, citations, news and media coverage, discussion on social media and websites, and inclusion in practice guidelines. These new metrics – ‘altmetrics’ – defined as anything that is not a citation, can be captured in a number of ways. The BJGP has launched the Altmetric donut, a colourful, arresting image which depicts the various media which have paid attention to a given article, with a numerical score reflecting the number of ‘mentions’. The Altmetric buttons, appearing within the ‘Info’ tab of each article, are not substitutes for traditional bibliometrics, but we think will become a useful addition to understanding how research results ‘get out’ and are incorporated into...

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Cannabis effects and future health policy

Roy Robertson is Professor of Addiction Medicine at the University of Edinburgh. The paper Cannabis, tobacco smoking, and lung function: a cross-sectional observational study in a general practice population was published in the BJGP this week. Access the full paper here. Cannabis and its effects on health are complicated and wide ranging. Like other drugs with an impact on multiple systems there is a considerable literature about negative features and, as with alcohol when much of the measurable effect is the reason for its ingestion, there are mixed views about its value. Added to the balance of benefits versus damaging side effects is its illegality, at least in most administrations. This is clearly changing in several countries and will allow a naturalistic experiment to be evaluated over the next few years. An upcoming United Nations debate in 2016, sponsored by Mexico and Uruguay, will further expose the legal control system to change and may revolutionise the availability in many western countries including the UK. At the present time it looks like cannabis use may well increase over the next decade and, if commercial interests enter the frame then there may well be a much broader range of people participating in its use. The possibility of major manufacturing and marketing companies taking control raises many spectres for medical services used to managing the ravages of alcohol. For medical people the...

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Quality indicators for child health in the UK

Peter Gill is a paediatric resident at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ontario and an Honorary Fellow at the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine at the University of Oxford. Follow Peter on Twitter @peterjgill In the December 2014 issue of the British Journal of General Practice, several colleagues and I published a set of paediatric quality indicators for UK primary care.[1] The paper represents the main findings from my doctoral thesis completed under the supervision of Prof David Mant and Anthony Harnden at Oxford University. It is exciting to see the paper in print (it provided a morale ‘boost’ after working a stretch of nights) accompanied by a thoughtful editorial.[2] But having returned to the ‘coal face’, I am reminded of the integral role of quality indicators in clinical practice. Why develop indicators? Caring for children is an important part of UK general practice yet several studies have demonstrated that care quality can be improved. However, only 3% of Quality Outcomes Framework (QOF) markers relate to children and there is no set of child-relevant indicators for UK primary care. For years, the call to develop and integrate child health indicators into QOF has fallen on deaf ears despite evidence that leaving out indicators probably has negatives consequences for care quality. Therefore, we sought to develop a set of quality indicators for children and adolescents which cover a range of paediatric care...

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Welcome to BJGP Life!

The British Journal of General Practice and BJGP Open are bringing research to clinical practice. This is where we add the debate and opinion to help ensure everyone benefits from that research.

BJGP Conference – 23 March 2018

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