Category: Clinical

Childhood trauma

Most children removed from their birth family have experienced multiple traumas. Hannah Milton finds that when talking to patients about anxiety, depression, addiction, relationship problems and difficulties with their own children’s behaviour, one her most useful history taking techniques is a simple question: “how was your childhood?”.

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The four research papers I wish my doctor had read before prescribing an antidepressant

The “Defeat Depression” campaign of the 1990s told us that anxiety and depression were caused by a “chemical imbalance in the brain”, and that SSRIs were safe, effective and non-addictive. We now know that virtually every part of that narrative is untrue. Stevie Lewis is a researcher and campaigner who highlights the need for services for patients withdrawing from SSRIs. She examines the evidence.

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Confronting the urinalysis tyrant

As GPs we know a lot about recurrent urinary tract infections. James Malone-Lee is Emeritus Professor of Medicine, University College London. His research suggests that most of what we think we know is wrong. Here he explains the evidence.

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Asking about suicide and self harm: moving beyond clinician discomfort

“I ask them – but I’m not asking them in a way that invites a ‘yes'” – It can be difficult to broach the subject of self-harm or suicidal thoughts during a consultation. After altering her practice since reading Ford et al’s recent study on clinician discomfort, Dr Claire Norman, GPST3, reflects on the real-life consequences of reframing those difficult questions.

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